Compare And Contrast The Wartime Experiences Of Three Of The Eight Women Who Came To The Front In – Case Study Example

Case Study: Women in the Second World War. Elizabeth May Adams Craig (1889-1975), known as journalist May Craig came from the Southern s but worked in Washington when the war broke out. She was not content to watch the awful events unfolding across Europe from the safe distance of the United States and she visist London, Normandy, Paris at the time of liberation, and other key places and events. Having been active in petitioning for women to have the vote, she also became involved in improving women’s career chances in journalism. Her ability to put up with hardship and cover all the most difficult assignments, including wartime coverage of servicemen on duty, carved a path for women journalists coming after her.
Janet Flanner (1892-1978) came from Indiana and moved to Paris in the culturally exciting period between the two world wars. She wrote a famous column for The New Yorker called “Letter from Paris” and a number of pieces on important issues like the rise of Hitler, the loss of European culture through the destrution of war, and the lengthy Nuremberg trials which were set up by the Allies to deal with Nazi war crimes. She also reported first hand on the liberation of Paris and captured in writing the emotional scenes of that time.
Esther Bubley (b. 1921) studied art and then worked as a photographer with Vogue and as a lab technician with the National Archives. Unlike the other two women mentioned above, Esther Bubley remained in the United States during the Second World War, and took photographs which documented how the war affected ordinary Americans in their everyday lives. Eventually she was recognised for her talent and invited to work for the Office of War Information, who funded her to go into the countryside and photograph people at work, including women driving buses, and many individuals caught up in preparations for the war effort.
References
“Women Come to the Front” Library of Congress Website. Available online at: http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/wcf/